Winning the opening match of the China Cup proved to be a mission impossible for the host natio

nal team, which fell 1-0 to Thailand on Thursday night in Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region.

While spectators at the sold-out 60,000-seat Guangxi Sports Center loudly vented their an

ger as the home squad left the pitch, within minutes hundreds of millions of netizens expressed their dis

appointment online, making the loss one of the hottest topics trending on Chinese social media.

By Friday morning, related topics had been viewed more

than 100 million times on Weibo, generating waves of criticism from fans and media.

“Team China was suppressed by the Thailand squad throu

ghout the whole match,” said Han Qiaosheng, a well-known sports commentator and TV anchor.

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Every morning, dozens of students from Myanmar walk hand in hand across the border into China’s Yunnan province.

There, they are led by patrol officers to Yinjing Frontier Primary School. After school, as they are es

corted to the border inspection station, they wave, tell the officers goodbye and return to their homes in Myanmar.

The students attend the first frontier primary school in China. Locat

ed in Yinjing village in the small border city of Ruili in Yunnan province, the school has 36 M

yanmar students and 99 Chinese students. Founded in 1960, it has been admitting students from Myanmar since 1990.

Wen Liang, 10, from Myanmar, has repeated this routine for three years. “I like goi

ng to school in China. It makes me very happy because I have many friends there,” Wen said.

The youngest Myanmar student is 5, said Sun Jialiang, the school principal.

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 school because speaking fluent Chinese is necessary for them to work in China or do business with China, Sun said.

The government in Ruili has invested 2.6 million yuan ($388,000) in impro

ving school facilities, including building a new school building, canteen and playground. T

he school has established a special foundation with donations from teachers, parents and officers at the in

spection station to sponsor impoverished Chinese and Burmese students in pursuing their studies, he said.

Ruili, an important land port for southwestern China, is described by a famous C

hinese song, There is a Beautiful Place, which describes its natural beauty and colorful folklore.

At the school, the students also can be heard singing another so

ng, “Two countries, one school, hand in hand, heart to heart, forever love.”

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  will leave the European Union without a transitional deal to protect trade. The Ba

nk of England has said the fallout from that scenario would be worse than the 2008 financial crisis.

  The big Brexit slowdown

  The United Kingdom was the fastest growing G7 economy when voters went to the polls in 2016. E

mergency action by the Bank of England helped the UK economy avoid the recession that some had

predicted would follow a vote in favor of Brexit, and unemployment remains very low.

  But the country still fell toward the bottom of the G7 rank

ing. Economic growth has slumped from an annual pace of around 2% to less than 1% now.

  Investment by UK companies stalled after the referendum and then plunged 3.7% in 2018. Me

anwhile, the rest of the G7 has seen business investment grow around 6% a year since the vote.

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  The question many New Zealanders are asking themselves in the wake of Friday’s deadly terrorist attacks on two mosques is: Why?

  Why was this island nation with fewer than 5 million people in the southwestern c

orner of the Pacific chosen for such a savage crime? Why should there be attacks on men, women an

d children who have gathered to pray? Why couldn’t the white supremacist be prevented from going on the killing spree?

  In native Maori language New Zealand is “Aotearoa”, or roughly the “land of the long w

hite cloud” which appeared to offer a quiet sanctuary from many of the evils that beset our world today.

  All that changed last Friday. By a crime of pure hate.

  The brutality of the attacks in Christchurch has stunned New Zealanders. It

was the sort of thing that happened in “other places”. They thought their land is a “proud nation” of more than 200 ethnic gr

oups and 160 languages-a land of diversity in which “we share common values”, as Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has said.

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  cancer of race hate than guns. It is an evil that has been with us for long, but it seems the cancer is now metastatic-it is spreading. It is be

ing spread by white, right-wing bigots who see conspiracies around every corner, and by religious zealots that are found in most religions.

  In the summer of 2011, an anti-Islamic right-wing extremist killed 77 people in Norway in a planned terrorist attack.

  Recent years have seen a surge in white supremacist violence in the United States. Every terrorist killing in the US last ye

ar was linked to right-wing extremism, according to the New York-based Anti-Defamation League.

  And let us not forget the part social media have played in providing a platform for a

ll racists and terrorists to spread their evil bile and distorted views of the world. Terrorism experts will say Ne

w Zealand was probably a soft target. Most of its police officers are not armed and the threat of terrorism is not high. Bu

t terrorist attacks have also taken place in countries where police officers are heavily armed and security is very tight.

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Serbian capital, Belgrade. Karadzic was heavily disguised by a white beard, long

hair and spectacles, living under a false identity as a “spiritual healer.”

Karadzic is the highest-ranking political figure to have been brought to justice over the bitter ethnic conflicts of the 1990s.

Wednesday’s judgement was handed down by the UN’s international residual mechanism for cr

iminal tribunals, which deals with cases left over from the now dissolved courts for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda.

In November 2017 the court also sentenced former Bosnian Serb army leader Ratko Mladi

c to life in prison after finding him guilty of genocide for atrocities committed during the Bosnian war from 1992 to 1995.

Mladic was charged with two counts of genocide and nine crim

es against humanity and war crimes for his role in the conflict in the former Yugoslavia fro

m 1992 to 1995, during which 100,000 people were killed and another 2.2 million displaced.

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  tension to the withdrawal process, given the unlikelihood of agreeing a deal before Mar

ch 29. May is expected to ask the remaining 27 EU member states for a delay at this week’s summit.

  It’s possible the EU may propose a long extension to the Brexit process and require the UK to take part in the upcoming European elections in May.

  Downing Street has used the prospect of a lengthy delay — which could be used to force a second

referendum — to try to persuade Brexiteer lawmakers that they risk losing Brexit altogether if they don’t vo

te for May’s deal.The man who opened fire on two New Zealand mosques last week may have succeeded in killing 50 pe

ople, but the country’s leader has promised to deny him the one thing he truly wanted: Notoriety.

  ”You will never hear me mention his name,” Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern told the New Zealand Parliament Tuesday.

  ”He is a terrorist, he is a criminal, he is an extremist, but he will, when I speak, be nameless, and

to others I implore you: Speak the names of those who were lost rather than the name of the man who took t

hem. He may have sought notoriety but we in New Zealand will give him nothing — not even his name.”

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  ijab as she stood in the center of a room, surrounded by families desperate to hear words of reassurance. They were tired, worried and m

any were grieving loved ones presumed killed in the hail of bullets fired by a man who singled them out for their beliefs.

  Even before she said a word, Ardern’s simple decision to cover

her hair served to show families she respected them and wanted to ease their pain.

  ”People were quite surprised. I saw people’s faces when she was wearing the hijab — th

ere were smiles on their faces,” said Ahmed Khan, a survivor of the attack who lost his uncle at the Al Noor mosque.

  Ali Akil, a member of Syrian Solidarity New Zealand who came to Christc

hurch to support the community, said wearing the hjiab was “a symbolic thing.”

  ”It’s saying I respect you, what you believe, and I’m here to help,” he said. “I’m very impressed.”

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  ment from ISIS spokesman, Abu Hassan al-Muhajir, accusing Ardern and other Western leaders of shedding “crocodile tears.”

  Al-Muhajir called upon ISIS supporters to “take vengeance” in the aftermath of the attack in an almost 45-min

ute audio recording. It’s believed to be the first recording released by al-Muhajir in months.

  New Zealand Members of Parliament gathered in the House on Tuesday to share condolenc

es for the victims. They will meet again on Wednesday, the same day Ardern intends to return to Christchurch.

  On Saturday, she visited members of Christchurch’s Muslim community wearin

g a hijab in what observers lauded as a meaningful gesture of compassion and respect.

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